SJA Summer Educational Symposium


Panel Sessions

Fostering Creative Response

 

How do we encourage generative creativity in our students and teachers in a post-pandemic environment?

 

Creativity and problem-solving are the skills most in demand in the future job market. Creativity, especially, is too infrequently considered a learned measurable skill that can be developed through teaching and practice. But as they effectively develop creativity in students, teachers need to rethink how they teach so that students are more readily engaged in their learning. Panelists will consider how creativity might be assessed in an educational community and measured as a multi-disciplinary skill as education shifts in a post-pandemic world.

 

Panelists:

Dr. Dennie Palmer Wolf

Principal Researcher, WolfBrown

Ivonne Chand O’Neal

Principal, MUSE Research

Rosie Prevost

Photographer, Educator, Fine Arts Department Chair at St. Johnsbury Academy

Lauren Shelton

Director of the Butler Community Arts School

Ping Ho

Founder & Director, UCLArts & Healing

 

Moving Beyond “Lost Learning”

 

How do we assess where our students are emotionally, socially, and academically, find them necessary wrap-around supports, and change the narrative of learning loss?

 

Education during the pandemic has been inconsistent at best; some students have thrived while others have struggled. Educational deficits need to be addressed immediately in order to prevent students from falling even farther behind, but teachers are already stretched as they work to balance student emotional and social needs with the demands of school and state-mandated curricula. Schools can’t simply return to a business-as-usual approach to teaching and learning after the pandemic, and they also face constraints imposed by budgets and staffing. Panelists will discuss post-pandemic student remediation as an immediate need that must be met with urgency and creativity.

 

Panelists:

John Rosinbum

Teacher, BASIS Tucson North

Jim Klipfel

High School Teacher, Coach, Adviser, Saugus High School

Julia Toews

Chief Academic Officer, BASIS Charter Schools

Molly Shepley

Educator

Using the Arts to Engage Marginalized, Underrepresented, and Disconnected Students

 

How can we grow and innovate Art programs to provide a path forward for students who have struggled to find success and their voice in their own education?

 

The pandemic has disproportionately impacted already marginalized and underrepresented students, and  many of these students are contending with the loss of safe spaces and support networks outside of their homes, especially if they are not attending school in person. Research suggests that we can use the creative arts to re-engage students in the learning process as well as provide emotional and social supports. This panel will discuss how creativity can act as a catalyst for disconnected students.

 

Panelists:

Gerardo Munoz

Social Studies Teacher, Denver Center for International Studies

Paul Gambill

Executive Director, Community Engagement Lab

Rosie Prevost

Photographer, Educator, Fine Arts Department Chair at St. Johnsbury Academy

Jen Mergel

Curator

Lauren Shelton

Director of the Butler Community Arts School

 

Students Inspiring Students

 

How do we help students create original programming that helps their at-risk and marginalized peers, and can we enhance existing programs currently at work in our own schools?

 

The power of students to inspire their peers by serving as role models, offering empathy, and inspiring change is one of the most important assets any school community possesses. Given agency, students can shape their learning communities and advocate for the needs of their peers.  This panel will focus on strategies to harness  the power of a school’s most important resource, its students, into the development of the school space in the post-pandemic world.

 

Panelists:

Jim Klipfel

High School Teacher, Coach, Adviser, Saugus High School

Dairrick Khalil Hodges

Performing Artist, Vocalist, Musician, Activist, Survivor

Janae Peters

Founding Faculty, The Mastery School of Hawken

Jessica Lahey

Writer

Ira Rounsaville

Social Worker, William S. Hart Union High School District

Martha Neubert

Dean of Equity and Social Justice, Northfield Mount Hermon School

Creative Placemaking

 

How do schools work with arts, cultural, and other institutions to expand their spaces and promote creative placemaking?

 

The past year has laid bare the fractured nature of many American communities. Political, cultural, and economic disparities and divergences have rent the social fabric. Creative placemaking offers opportunities for schools to play a vital role in helping to repair this damage. By partnering with other stakeholders in the community, schools can help to create arts-centered spaces that foster inclusivity, cooperation, and a shared sense of belonging. Creative placemaking strives to change the physical and social environment of a community through collaboration. Presenters will discuss creative placemaking, the research behind it, and how it has been put into action in communities throughout America.

 

Panelists:

Ivonne Chand O’Neal

Principal, MUSE Research

Jen Mergel

Curator

Jody Fried

Executive Director, Catamount Arts

Rosie Prevost

Photographer, Educator, Fine Arts Department Chair at St. Johnsbury Academy

Paul Gambill

Executive Director, Community Engagement Lab

 

Meeting the Mental Health and Social-Emotional Needs of Students—and Teachers

 

How do we teach resilience, and marshal our community’s resources to support those affected by the pandemic?

 

The trauma of the past year has been well documented, and emphasized the importance of schools as a safe and supportive space for students, particularly those who are members of marginalized communities. Teachers play the role of  caregiver, counselor, and role model for many students, and feel most successful when they are actively improving the lives and learning outcomes for the students they serve. With the challenges of the pandemic undercutting this ability to feel successful, teachers too have suffered trauma. This panel will discuss the ways in which schools can reestablish themselves as safe spaces for students and teachers alike. Panelists will discuss ways to meet the social-emotional needs of school community members in a post-pandemic world.

 

Panelists:

Ping Ho
Founder & Director, UCLArts & Healing

Jim Klipfel

High School Teacher, Coach, Adviser, Saugus High School

Jessica Lahey

Writer

Ira Rounsaville

Social Worker, William S. Hart Union High School District

Janae Peters

Founding Faculty, The Mastery School of Hawken

Where to Begin? Seeding Justice in Our Schools

 

How do our schools move forward to address diversity, equity, inclusion, and systemic change, given the multiple crises of the past year?

 

The pandemic has magnified issues of equity in our nation. Schools have long been asked to create just spaces that promote the value of diverse, equitable, and inclusive communities. In these attempts, often the best intentions have failed to bear fruit. This panel will focus on how we might better plant the seeds of DEI in our school communities, nurture the results of early efforts, and work with community stakeholders to foster sustained growth in a search for justice.

 

Panelists:

Martha Neubert

Dean of Equity and Social Justice, Northfield Mount Hermon School

Eliza Alexander

Managing Director, Northern New England, AISNE

Dairrick Khalil Hodges

Performing Artist, Vocalist, Musician, Activist, Survivor

Gerardo Munoz

Social Studies Teacher, Denver Center for International Studies

Molly Shepley

Educator

Julia Toews

Chief Academic Officer, BASIS Charter Schools

 

Rethinking the “Class-Room” and the Student Learning Experience

 

How do we use lessons learned from the pandemic to rethink our use of time, technology, instruction, and classroom spaces in which we teach?

 

The pandemic has forced teachers to rethink the student learning experience and expedited dramatic change in instructional practices—many for the better, some for the worst. Several ideas have pushed to the forefront with this explosion of the traditional classroom: it has become clear that the traditional classroom is outmoded in many ways; some students have excelled in the virtual classroom while others have struggled; asynchronous learning models can be effective for many students; in some classrooms less content has provided more opportunities for students. This panel will discuss the rapidly changing classroom and the opportunities that exist for students and teachers alike.

 

Panelists:

Kathleen Coghill

AP Capstone and Environmental Science Teacher, William H. Hall High School

John Rosinbum

Teacher, BASIS Tucson North

Dr. Dennie Palmer Wolf

Principal Researcher, WolfBrown

Aaron Bryan

Director of Arts Education for the Fresno County Superintendent of Schools

Paul Gambill

Executive Director, Community Engagement Lab

 

 

 

For questions about the Symposium, contact Steve Jolliffe at (802) 745-7498 or stjolliffe@stjacademy.org.